SABZ BURJ


CONTRIBUTED BY SAHIL AHUJA

Sabz Burj (Green tower) is located close to the Humayun’s Tomb Complex. It is amongst the most publicly located but yet one of the least known monuments in Delhi. One of the most interesting facts about its little known history is that for several years during British rule, the tower was used as a police station.

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Description                 Despite its name, the tower is not green. Originally it had green tiles covering its dome and drum, thus giving it its name, but a restoration fiasco saw the tower end up with brilliant blue tiles. In fact, now the tower is referred to as “Neeli Chattri” (Blue umbrella).
History The tower was supposedly built in between 1530-50 A.D. though it is not known who commissioned it.
Construction The medium height, octagonal tower is influenced by Central Asian architecture. It consists of alternating wide & narrow sides. Entrances have been built into the wider sides, while the narrower sides are ornamented in a pattern of incised plaster, paint or glazed tile. One can still see green, yellow and blue tiles in varied patterns on its drum.There is no grave inside the structure and its purpose of construction is not clear.
Protection  Sabz Burj is today a protected monument under the aegis of the Archaeological Survey of India.
Ownership    Archaeological Survey of India
Location         Located right outside Humayun’s Tomb Complex the tower stands in the middle of a traffic square on the intersection of Mathura Road and Lodi Road. Nearest metro station is Jangpura. Nearest Railway station is Hazrat Nizamuddin Station. From either one can take a bus/auto for Humayun’s Tomb Complex.
Remark     The structure was chemically cleaned some years back. Recently, it was restored for the Commonwealth Games 2010 that were held in Delhi. Illumination was also provided on the roundabout around the tower to make it more popular among tourists. Visitor-entry is however prohibited.For a detailed write up on the tower click more!

You have new information on this heritage resource do let us know ! Write to us at info@cattsindia.org

Disclaimer: The article expresses individual views of the author. The rights to the content of the article rests with the author.

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